Welcome to the North Carolina Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association

The Trail of Tears Association (TOTA) is a non-profit organization formed in 1993 to support the development and interpretation of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Designated by Congress in 1987, the National Trail commemorates the forced removal of Cherokee people from their homelands in the southeastern United States to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) in the late 1830s. TOTA maintains chapters in each of the nine states containing segments of the Trail.

This website presents the work of TOTA members in North Carolina. Click on the wayside exhibits below to learn about significant sites we have marked and interpreted in recent years. Follow the maps to visit the sites yourself and experience the story of Cherokee struggle, resistance, and perseverance in Western North Carolina.

This website was made possible by a grant from the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership.

BRNHA-PMSshieldTOTAlogoNCTOTA_Logo

  • aquoheecourthouse_thumbAquohee District Courthouse.

  • “scott-thumb"Camp Scott

  • CherCoMuseum300x225Cherokee County Historical Museum

  • hiding-thumb2Creek Resistance in Hanging Dog Mtns.

  • Fort ButlerFort Butler

  • delaney-thumbnailFort Delaney

  • Fort HembreeFort Hembree

  • Lindsay-thumbnailFort Lindsay

  • Fort Montgomery

  • StateThumbnailGreat State & Old Army Roads

  • junaluska-thumbnailJunaluska Memorial

  • MOCI-thumbMuseum of the Cherokee Indian

  • nantahalathumbNantahala Town

  • quallathumbQualla Town

  • UnakaRoadSanitized-thumbUnicoy Turnpike

  • hiding-thumb2Valley River Resistance

  • indian_school-thumbValley Town Baptist Mission

From Facebook

#womenshistorymonth The late Beloved Woman Maggie Axe Wachacha, from the Snowbird Community, was a clerk for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Tribal Council for half a century. A fluent Cherokee speaker who could also read and write the language, she kept the records of Tribal Council meetings for decades. In 1986, she was recognized in the 100 American Heroes listing by Newsweek as well as being given the North Carolina Distinguished Woman Award from then-Governor Jim Martin. She was a noted midwife and herbal healer. Wachacha was given the title of Beloved Woman in 1978 and passed away at the age of 101 in 1993. (Photo courtesy of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian) ... See MoreSee Less

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